Pulse Industry

Project Abstract: Selecting Early Maturing Dry Bean Lines with Improved Disease Resistance

Dry bean is the third largest pulse crop grown and exported from Canada. Alberta is the third largest dry bean producer with a farm gate value of approximately $35 million and an export value of approximately $90 million annually. Alberta accounts for 17% of the acres and 25% of the production in Canada.

Alberta has a short growing season (100 to 105 frost-free days) for dry bean production. Therefore, bean cultivars developed in Ontario, Manitoba and the USA are late maturing, and have poor seed yield and quality when grown in Alberta. High seed yield and quality, early maturity, upright plant architecture, lodging resistance, and resistance to diseases are important traits to the dry bean growers and the industry.

A major impediment to dry bean production is the lack of early maturing dry bean cultivars with resistance to the most prevalent diseases especially white mould and common bacterial blight. Development of disease resistant cultivars is one of the most effective and environmentally sustainable methods for reducing yield losses and promoting stable crop production.

Disease resistant cultivars will i) increase seed yield and enhance seed quality, ii) reduce chemical use, and iii) enhance profitability of bean production, and ensure the dry bean industry remains competitive and environmentally sustainable in the long term. The objective of this project is to select early maturing dry bean lines with improved resistance to common bacterial blight and white mould.

Hybridizations in the greenhouse, generation advance followed by selection in the field, and yield trials were conducted each year in southern Alberta in order to select high yielding lines with early maturity, upright plant architecture, lodging resistance, seed quality and improved resistance to diseases. Molecular markers (SU91 and BC420) linked to common bacterial blight resistant genes were used to screen lines with disease resistance. Dry bean lines were also assessed for common bacterial blight resistance in a disease nursery at AAFC-Morden by Dr. Conner. Disease severity and incidence, molecular marker data and data from the yield trials were used to select high yielding lines with improved resistance to common bacterial blight. Dry bean lines in the registration trials were assessed for white mould incidence and severity in an irrigated disease nursery at AAFC-Lethbridge in collaboration with Dr. Chatterton. White mould disease data were used to select high yielding lines with improved resistance to the disease. Also, data from the nursery was used by the Prairie Recommending Committee for Pulse and Special Crops when making decisions on lines to support for registration in Canada.

Starting in 2014, a black bean cultivar AAC Black Diamond 2 with improved resistance to common bacterial blight; pinto bean cultivars AAC Burdett and AAC Explorer with improved white mould resistance and seed quality; great northern bean cultivars AAC Whitehorse and AAC Whitestar with improved white mould resistance and seed quality; and two yellow bean cultivars AAC Y012 and AAC Y015 with early maturity and improved seed coat colour were registered for commercial production in Canada.

Project lead: Dr. Parthiba Balasubramanian (403) 317-2275 parthiba.balasubramanian@agr.gc.ca

 

Canada is one of the leading exporters of dry bean crop with over 75% of the produce exported to other countries.  Alberta is the third largest producer of dry bean in Canada. White mould and common bacterial blight disease are two major production constraints to dry bean under irrigation in Alberta and Saskatchewan.  Therefore, development of high yielding, early maturing cultivars with improved resistance to the above diseases will reduce chemical use and ensure long-term viability of the dry bean industry in the Prairie Provinces.  Complete genetic resistance to white mould and common bacterial blight is lacking.  However, dry bean genotypes with partial disease resistance have been identified.  The objective of this sub-activity is to transfer partial resistance to white mould and common bacterial blight in to high yielding, early maturing dry bean cultivars grown in Alberta and Saskatchewan.  Each year, dry bean cultivars and elite lines from the breeding program were crossed to disease resistant lines.  The F1 seeds were seed increased in the greenhouse and the F2 seeds were planted in the field at Lethbridge and Vauxhall, AB.   Single plant selections were made based on upright plant architecture, maturity, yield potential and disease resistance (natural inoculum).  Single plant selections were assessed for seed quality during winter.  The selections were advanced to F3 and to F4 nurseries and single plant selections were made.  Preliminary yield assessments were made in the F5 generation at Lethbridge, AB.  Seeds of selected lines were provided to Dr. Conner at AAFC-Morden for assessment of common bacterial blight resistance in a field disease nursery.  In 2015, 16 genotypes were assessed for resistance to common bacterial blight at AAFC-Morden, and disease resistant lines will be advanced in the breeding program in 2016 in the development of future cultivars.  Due to limited seed availability of dry bean lines, white mould resistance will be assessed in later generations.

 

Project lead: Dr. Parthiba Balasubramanian   (403) 317-2275   parthiba.balasubramanian@agr.gc.c

Canada is one of the leading exporters of dry bean crop with over 75% of the produce exported to other countries. Alberta is the third largest producer of dry bean in Canada. White mould and common bacterial blight disease are two major production constraints to dry bean under irrigation in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Therefore, development of high yielding, early maturing cultivars with improved resistance to the above diseases will reduce chemical use and ensure long-term viability of the dry bean industry in the Prairie Provinces. Complete genetic resistance to white mould and common bacterial blight is lacking. However, dry bean genotypes with partial disease resistance have been identified. The objective of this sub-activity is to transfer partial resistance to white mould and common bacterial blight in to high yielding, early maturing dry bean cultivars grown in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Each year, dry bean cultivars and elite lines from the breeding program were crossed to disease resistant lines. The F1 seeds were seed increased in the greenhouse and the F2 seeds were planted in the field at Lethbridge and Vauxhall, AB. Single plant selections were made based on upright plant architecture, maturity, yield potential and disease resistance (natural inoculum). Single plant selections were assessed for seed quality during winter. The selections were advanced to F3 and to F4 nurseries and single plant selections were made. Preliminary yield assessments were made in the F5 generation at Lethbridge, AB. Seeds of selected lines were provided to Dr. Conner at AAFC-Morden for assessment of common bacterial blight resistance in a field disease nursery. In 2015, 16 genotypes were assessed for resistance to common bacterial blight at AAFC-Morden, and disease resistant lines will be advanced in the breeding program in 2016 in the development of future cultivars. Due to limited seed availability of dry bean lines, white mould resistance will be assessed in later generations.

 

Project lead: Dr. Parthiba Balasubramanian (403) 317-2275 parthiba.balasubramanian@agr.gc.ca

 

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