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They concluded that a lentil-based sports nutrition bar offers a metabolic advantage during endurance exercise and enhances recovery following exercise.

New Research Results: Making
Healthy Pulse Food Products


In 2010, the Government of Canada announced it would provide $7 million to the Canadian pulse industry for a research cluster of over 100 industry, government and university scientists to develop ways to improve pulse crop productivity, nutrition, and improve the rotational benefits in relation to other crops. This research is helping to identify new and innovative ways of processing and using pulses that will help grow new market opportunities for the industry. The first Pulse Science Cluster Scientific meeting was held at the Radisson Hotel in Saskatoon, SK on November 17 & 18, 2011 and over 40 people attended the meeting.

At the meeting, Dr. Phil Chilibeck from the University of Saskatchewan presented results from one of the Pulse Science Cluster studies that compared pre-exercise feeding with: 1) a low glycemic index lentil-based sport nutrition bar (Genki bar); 2) a commercially-available sport nutrition bar (PowerBar); and 3) diet jelly (placebo) on metabolism and performance during endurance cycling. Endurance athletes consumed either a lentil bar, a PowerBar, or the placebo one hour before endurance cycling that involved 75 minutes at a moderate intensity, followed by a 7 km time trial. They found that both the lentil bar and PowerBar improved time trial performance compared to control. The lentil bar also improved next-day time trial performance compared to both the PowerBar and control. They concluded that a lentil-based sports nutrition bar offers a metabolic advantage during endurance exercise and enhances recovery following exercise.

Results from another Pulse Science Cluster study conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto were presented by Christopher Smith, a co-investigator in the study. This project investigated the short-term health effects associated with cooked navy bean powder. The main objective of the study was was to determine the effects of whole and processed navy beans on blood glucose and subjective appetite over 200 minutes. Males (n=17, age: 22.1±0.8 y and BMI: 22.9±0.3 kg/m2) received each of the 3 treatments (whole navy beans, puréed navy beans and cooked navy bean powder) or control (whole wheat flour) in random order. A fixed-energy pizza meal (12 kcal/kg of body weight) was provided at 120 min and blood glucose and subjective appetite ratings were measured throughout each session. All navy bean treatments reduced blood glucose at 30 min (<0.0001), however only the treatment with whole navy beans significantly reduced mean blood glucose over the duration of the study compared with the control, while puréed navy beans and navy bean powder produced intermediate glycaemia. All navy bean treatments significantly reduced subjective appetite compared with control. The researchers concluded that processed powdered navy beans can be used as a value-added food ingredient to moderate glycaemic response and increase satiety